Food & Drink Monday, April 23rd

Coffee crawl: Hereford's best brews

Food & Drink Monday, April 23rd

Coffee crawl: Hereford's best brews

Last week was UK Coffee Week. Some people used that to help raise money for Project Waterfall in Ethiopa. We used it as an opportunity to drink a bucketload of the stuff.

We don't recommend you try getting through all of the below in one afternoon, unless you've got the resting pulse rate of a Tour De France winner. But if you like your coffee, you should check them all out at some point.

1

Sabores de Portugal, 126 Eign St.

Even if we’ve now got more Costas per square mile than pigeons*, us Brits are historically a tea-drinking nation. We’re late to the coffee game when compared with our Mediterranean cousins. So when it comes to ordering the kind of short, sharp shot of java that puts a bounce in your step and a smile on your face, head over to Hereford’s Portuguese café by Steels. Their espresso will make you forget all about PG Tips.

Bonus tip: Order it with the pastéis de nata. It’s the Portuguese version of tea ‘n’ biscuits. Except, by doing it their way, you get a piping-hot punch of espresso and a smooth and sweet custard, oven-baked tart to even things out.

(*probably not true.)

Beans:

Delta Gold (African Robusta and Arabica), from a Portuguese roasting company.

They say:

“I think espresso coffee is more intense and mainly that's why everyone who enjoys to drink coffee prefers it.

“Also our place is not fabricated like the franchises so we talk to our customers and always have fresh coffee – the Delta Gold is balanced and full of vitality, with a slight hint of honey and ripe fruit. Our machine is sanremo-capri deluxe.”

More here.

Sabores

.....................

2

McDonalds

Alrightalrightalrightalright - just kidding. It is definitely not McDonalds, no matter how many of those patronising, 'goodness how ever will normal people understand what a flat white is?' ads they pepper your TV screen with. Seriously McDonalds, it's been five years and literaly no-one is out there saying 'Janet, fancy popping down the McCafé?' Please, please let it go. You still have the best fries, just roll with that. 

The actual best flat white?

King Street Kitchen, 12 King St.

Although their straight-up flat white’s great (that’s what the boss drinks), King St gets the nod thanks to their coconut milk flat whites. This is not like one of those Raspberry Chia Soy Milk Latte coffee-in-name-only situations. It’s a subtle remix. You’ve still got the holy trinity of great beans, milk and hot water, it’s just got a little twist that will raise your eyebrow. (But if you're looking for something to a little more spicy, they also have a tumeric and ginger latte on the books)

Beans:

James Gourmet Coffee, Sitio Grota Sao Pedro, Brazil

They say:

“We started off using cocnut milk in hot chocolates – they taste like a Bounty bar – then tried it in coffees, now the only problem’s stocking enough of it.

“It’s vegan as well, which is great with having the Firefly over the road.”

More here.

22467470 1467524556657096 4968927676232061514 o

.....................

3

Bottomless filter coffee at the Beefy Boys, the Old Market.

You know those scenes in American movies where a Jennifer Anniston-type wanders around a Tennessee diner with a coffee pot, asking the dungaree’d customers in her sweetest, Southern accent, ‘Can I top you off, hun?’.  Well, aside from the Tennessee accent, and the dungarees, and the looming sense of generational racism – this is what you get when you order a coffee at the Beefy Boys. Pick your times well because tables are often busy for food orders, but their bottomless filter coffee is one of Hereford’s best kept secrets.

Beans:

James Gourmet Coffee, custom blend.

They say:

“The beans we use are a special blend created for us by James Gourmet, based off the flavour profile of a classic American diner coffee.”

More here.

BeefyCoffee

..................... 

5

Sensory + Rye, Union Street

Their cold brew - which you can enjoy hot if you like, or over ice, or with milk, or in a cocktail, or pretty much any way that doesn’t involve shooting it straight in to your veins – takes all night to brew it right, but the result is a light, sweet beverage that doesn’t have the bitter notes you may associate with coffee. Also it’s hella caffeinated.

Beans:

Guatemalan, from Method Roastery.

Food writer Holland Otik says:

“It's kind of like herbal tea on steroids – the Method Guatemala brew tastes oaky, slightly like burned caramel, and oddly berryish.

“You can really imagine the whole coffee plant, not just the roasted little bean that we see.”

More here.

coldbrewSensory

.....................

4

The Shack Revolution, Bastion Mews.

Because coffee does not have to just be for the daylight hours - and because espresso martinis make your little 'breakfast vodka' much more socially acceptable.

The Shack have a great espresso machine which they use to make fresh coffee for each martini, and they also work with coffee guru Pete James to find the right roast to blend with the Chase vodka.

Beans:

James Gourmet, Brazilian roast

They say:

"We use our good friends James Gourmet Coffee's (based in Ross-on-Wye) Brazilian roast coffee beans, with hints of roasted nut, chocolaty undertones and sugar cane in our espresso martinis.

“I love the smooth crema and sweet flavour which dance on your taste buds - and we’d like to think we have the best in town!”

More here.

31113796 10160388844330442 7500424783415214080 n

.....................

6

The V60 at Sensory + Rye, Union Street.

If you’re getting in to your coffee, and you’ve got five minutes to spare, try a V60 drip at Sensory + Rye. It gives you that fun, DIY mad scientist vibe without actually having to buy all the kit and worry about weighing beans on a scale any time you want a brew. The method though, is said to give you a purer, more subtle taste of the beans than you get by blasting it with hot water in an espresso machine (he says in his most hipster voice).

Beans:

Choice of five single origin beans – but the Tanzanian's pretty damn good.

They say:

“You use a much coarser grind than you would for an espresso, and then, using a pouring kettle, you add the water bit-by-bit over the coffee and through the V60 (‘v’ for the shape, 60 for the angle of the sides) until you’ve got your drink.

“It takes longer, that’s why get the sweeter flavour, but it also means you can taste a lot more.”

More here.

V60

Do you want to write for Herefordshire Live? Get in touch on Facebook, Twitter or say hello@herefordshirelive.co.uk